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About the 2014 Premier’s Awards for Open Data

The 2014 Premier’s Awards for Open Data recognises and celebrates the innovative use of publicly released Queensland Government data to improve service delivery for Queenslanders.

The winners of the 2014 Premier’s Awards for Open Data were announced at a ceremony in Brisbane on Tuesday 2 December 2014.

A prize pool of $15,000 in cash was awarded to the entrants who demonstrated the most innovative use of, and real outcomes from, public data in the following categories:

  • Best use of open data
  • Best commercial app
  • Best community app
  • Best Queensland public servant entry.

Microsoft also awarded an additional prize to the entrant who demonstrated the most start-up potential.

Congratulations to the winners of the 2014 Premier’s Awards for Open Data.

Best use of open data

Winner: WikiQueensland—a big data fusion system

Xue Li, Xiaofang Zhou, Sayan Unankard, Shazia Sadiq, Ling Chen, Weitong Chen

WikiQueensland provides a comprehensive view of all publicly accessible Queensland Government data and uses a ranking mechanism to demonstrate the quality of life in Queensland. Users can search and visualise the ranking scores in four categories: safety, healthcare, education and living standards. In addition, data from social networks like Twitter is gathered to analyse local sentiment about current issues, such as budget and traffic conditions.

Finalist: h!Story—explore Queensland through time and place

Wade Milne, Rino Breebaart, Matt Curr, Nathen Street

h!Story is a concept tablet application using Department of Natural Resources and Mines’ historical maps and photos. It’s a crowd sourcing platform to capture users’ stories and other information from their past, bringing maps and images to life. Using the device's location capabilities, users can view maps and images at their current location to look through a window to the past. Imagine standing in front of the Story Bridge or the main street of Longreach and seeing what life was like 50 or 100 years ago.

Finalist: Queensland Globe mapper

Land Solution Australia

The idea is that a mobile device or tablet can be used to view open data sets from the Queensland Globe(s) or other private globes and communicate information from the field back to the globe. The user can confirm the validity of current information in the field and record other spatial data such as position, photographs, measurements or other information. The user then submits this data to the cloud so that others can view and access the improvements made by the user. For example, home owners could confirm address details for emergency services response, or images, video and spatial data could be sent by users to support extreme weather events.

Best commercial app

Winner: Truii.com—big data concepts for small business

Nick Marsh, Sylvain Arene

Truii.com helps to bring big data concepts to small businesses by leveraging data from small business and combining it with public open data to create insight. Truii.com provides a large collection of data wrangling functions to allow non data specialists to simultaneously share, manage and maintain version control of their data. This allows teams that share data to work more efficiently. Truii.com also has public libraries so that teams can leverage their data by mashing it up with open data resources.

Finalist: Farm mapping using LIDAR

Robert Howard

LIDAR is a powerful tool that provides high resolution spatial information about the land and is used to identify areas for differential management. Precision agricultural techniques are widely used in broad-acre cropping systems however the cost of integrated differential GPS systems is in the thousands of dollars—beyond the reach of many small farmers. LIDAR can bring the benefits of precision agriculture to the smaller farmer at a fraction of the cost.

Finalist: TAFE Queensland myProfiler

Tracey Jones, Alyce Thew, Lara Liddell, Laura Rainbird, Alexandra Reed

TAFE Queensland's myProfiler is a custom built app that identifies an individual’s career profile based on 12 visual questions. Not only does myProfiler help Queenslanders find the right career and courses that may be suited to them, the data collected in the app is used to inform the continued improvement of products and services that TAFE Queensland offers.

Best community app

Winner: Derivative maps of Queensland

Dru Taylor, David Uhlmann

This is an interactive website where users can go to map multiple levels of data from different sources. The example provided used road crash data and showed blue to red and light to dark heat and political maps. The lighter the colouring the lower the number of car crashes, while red represented an older population in the area. The entrants are planning to include graphs and other functionalities so the data can be more easily visualised and accessible to the community.

Finalist: Queensland Seniors and Carers Business Discount Directory mobile app

Jonathan Whiting, Daniel Pollard

This is a mobile pocket-sized version of Queensland Seniors and Carers Business Discount Directory. It includes data for all Queensland regions (the hard copy is split into eight regional editions) and is packed full of extra features which make it easy for users to find discounts and offers on the move.

Finalist: Race relations on the colonial frontier

Benjamin Hall

Our colonial history is only vaguely understood but the archives revealed on the open data website tell, from firsthand accounts, the powerful way in which colonialism was experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The aim is to create a story-map based on the archive of the colonial secretary's records. The story-map will be an interactive website using the latest Geographical Information System technology to map the archives so that people can view the archive from their smart phones.

Best Queensland public servant entry

Winner: Pulse

Paul Carr – Department of the Premier and Cabinet

Pulse is an app which provides the community with simple updates on recent Queensland Government policy changes as they happen. Queenslanders can stay up to date with what's going on in their state and the Queensland Government receives feedback to assist with making future decisions.

Finalist: h!Story–explore Queensland through time and place

Wade Milne, Rino Breebaart, Matt Curr, Nathen Street – Department of Natural Resources and Mines

h!Story is a concept tablet application using Department of Natural Resources and Mines’ historical maps and photos. It’s a crowd sourcing platform to capture users’ stories and other information from their past, bringing the maps and images to life. Using the device's location capabilities, users can view maps and images at their current location to look through a window to the past. Imagine standing in front of the Story Bridge or the main street of Longreach and seeing what life was like 50 or 100 years ago.

Finalist: TAFE Queensland myProfiler

Tracey Jones, Alyce Thew, Lara Liddell, Laura Rainbird, Alexandra Reed – TAFE Queensland

TAFE Queensland's myProfiler is a custom built app that identifies an individual’s career profile based on 12 visual questions. Not only does myProfiler help Queenslanders find the right career and courses that may be suited to them, the data collected in the app is used to inform the continued improvement of products and services that TAFE Queensland offers.

Microsoft StartUp Q Award

Winner: WikiQueensland—a big data fusion system

Xue Li, Xiaofang Zhou, Sayan Unankard, Shazia Sadiq, Ling Chen, Weitong Chen

WikiQueensland provides a comprehensive view of all publicly accessible Queensland Government data and uses a ranking mechanism to demonstrate the quality of life in Queensland. Users can search and visualise the ranking scores in four categories: safety, healthcare, education and living standards. In addition, data from social networks like Twitter is gathered to analyse local sentiment about current issues, such as budget and traffic conditions.

Finalist: Derivative maps of Queensland

Dru Taylor, David Uhlmann

This is an interactive website where users can go to map multiple levels of data from different sources. The example provided used road crash data and showed blue to red and light to dark heat and political maps. The lighter the colouring the lower the number of car crashes, while red represented an older population in the area. The entrants are planning to include graphs and other functionalities so the data can be more easily visualised and accessible to the community.

Finalist: Pulse

Paul Carr – Department of the Premier and Cabinet

Pulse is an app which provides the community with simple updates on recent Queensland Government policy changes as they happen. Queenslanders can stay up to date with what's going on in their state and the Queensland Government receives feedback to assist with making future decisions.

More information about the Premier’s Open Data Awards

For more information about the awards, contact:
Awards Coordinator
2014 Premier’s Awards for Open Data
Department of the Premier and Cabinet
Email: opendataawards@premiers.qld.gov.au
Phone: +61 7 3003 9200

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